Fine Art Photography

The Look

Fine Art Photography

Outrageous Fran

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Te Aratika Drilling Album

North Shore Rock Location

Interview

District Offices

District Offices

Fred and Mark

House

Portrait Photographer Auckland Portrait Photographer Auckland  Portrait Photographer Auckland

Rock Pool

Gnome

Gnome

Gnome

Portraiture Workshop

Kiri

Casts Forever – Boys Whatever

People photographer Auckland

Cats Forever – Boys Whatever

Madison Dewalt

Nude photography Auckland

Nude Photography Auckland

Nude photography Auckland

Nude photography Auckland

 

Nude photography Auckland

Nude photography Auckland

Nude photography Auckland

Sophie!

Nude Photography Auckland

Fearless

Nude Photography Auckland

Sophie

The subject of the female figure is an artistic tradition which indicates the historic value of beauty and fertility. Nudity has been a fundamental element of art throughout history. It has been used in paintings, sculptures, and other art forms to depict the human form, to express emotions and ideas, and to convey cultural and social messages. The role of nudity in art has changed over time, with changing cultural, religious, and social attitudes towards the human body.

In ancient times, nudity was often used in art to represent the supernatural. Nude female figures represented in art can be found as early as the Upper Palaeolithic era – the last Stone Age period. Similar images which represent fertility deities, gods and goddesses in Babylonian and Ancient Egyptian art were precursors to the works of Western antiquity. Greek and Roman artists frequently depicted gods and goddesses in the nude, as a symbol of their power and divine nature. Other notable traditions of artistic nude representations can be found in India and Japan: in particular, traditional Hindu temple sculptures and cave paintings -some very explicit- indicate the value of sexuality; a reveal a culture where partial or complete nudity was common in everyday life. In Early Christian art, the naked human figure was seen as a symbol of corruption and sin.

During the Renaissance period, artists began to incorporate the nude figure in their work more frequently, using it to express the beauty of the human form and to explore the complexity of human emotions. Athletes, dancers, and warriors statically express human energy and life, while nudes express basic and complex emotions. Artists like Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci created famous works depicting the nude figure. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, nudity became a more controversial subject in art. Artists like Édouard Manet and Gustave Courbet challenged traditional attitudes towards the human body, introducing more realistic and honest depictions of nudity. This trend continued into the 20th century, with artists like Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali incorporating nudity into their works to express more surreal and abstract ideas.

Today, nudity in art continues to be a source of debate and controversy. Some see it as a powerful expression of human beauty and emotion, while others view it as inappropriate or even offensive. Despite this, nudity remains an important element of art, continuing to push the boundaries of what is acceptable by society. The nude has been a prominent subject of photography since its invention, and played an important role in establishing photography as a fine art medium. Fine art nude photography is a genre that captures the beauty and aesthetic of the human body, with an emphasis on form, composition, emotional content, and aesthetic qualities. This form of photography has been practiced for centuries and can be seen in various art movements such as classical, romantic, and modern. Fine art nude photography challenges and subverts societal norms and stereotypes surrounding nudity and the human body. It also celebrate the human form and explore themes such as sexuality, gender, and identity. It can also be controversial and may be subject to censorship and societal criticism. 

Erotic interest, although often present, is secondary; which distinguishes art photography from both glamour and pornographic photography. The distinction is not always clear, and photographers tend to characterise their own work subjectively, although viewers may have  different impressions. The nude is a controversial subject across all artistic mediums, but more so within photography due to the inherent realism. The medium examines issues of representation and identity, sexuality and voyeurism – some nude photography deliberately blur the boundaries between erotica and art. In the context of the 21st century, it is difficult to make an artistic statement in the medium of nude photography, given the proliferation of pornographic imagery – which has tainted the artistic subject in the perception of most viewers, limiting the opportunities to exhibit or publish artistic nude images

In this series, I explore the female nude figure through a collection of photographs on location. I aim to create images that are aesthetically pleasing and evoke an emotional response. I use lighting, composition, and posing techniques to create mood. I endeavor to respect the boundaries and sensitivities of my subjects and viewers and always obtain informed consent before creating these images. In presenting this series, I offer opportunities to contemplate and appreciate the juxtaposition between human and nature: soft flesh and harsh environment; life and stillness; white and black. The use of monochrome emphasises the nude shape and form, removing distracting elements to ensure that you focus on the beautiful feminine body language. These photographs portray powerful, vulnerable, and independent women who are depicted through fresh, inspiring and original artwork.

In presenting this series, I offer opportunities to contemplate and appreciate the juxtaposition between human and nature: soft flesh and harsh environment; life and still; white and black. The use of monochrome emphasises the nude shape and form, removing distracting elements to ensure that you focus on the beautiful body language. These photographs portray powerful and independent women who are depicted through fresh, inspiring and original artwork.

Nude Photography Auckland

Zoe

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Tamsin

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Melissa

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Ivy

Nude Photography Auckland

Eve

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Lucie

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Fernanda

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Viviane

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Karin

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Virginia

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Nakita

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Meg

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Shazia

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Light at the Tunnel

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Vendy

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Le Corre

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Poppy

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Maddison

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Aimee

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Minh-Ly

 

Nude Photography Auckland

On the Rocks

 

Autumn Leaves

 

The wave Breaker

 

The Nymph

 

Nude Photographer Auckland

Giuliana

 

The Huntress

 

Woman on a Tree

 

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Juxtaposition

 

Drought

 

The Bride

 

By the Sea

I let the cold porcelain bruise it’s way into my knees
Some days I sit there long enough that my skin looks like it could peel from my flesh
I feel each individual drop of water soak the skin on my back rising and falling down protruding vertebrae
It flows no different to the rapids of a river rolling across jagged stone
And quietly to myself I beg it to wash away the ache that seems it has so effortlessly weaved its way into every cell in my body
The way cancer would spread
Or weeds over grow a garden once cared for

You are how I measure time now
Before you and after you
And you are how I measure beauty too
No one quite compares to you
I am not afraid of the dark anymore
It lives inside of me and I in it
On the nights my hearts composure decomposes
and my grief feels no different to drowning
I walk the streets of this ghost town I once walked with you
At witching hour just the moon and i
A humble smile as a disguise to mask the screams I hold inside
My body feels like bags of rocks
And I wonder if my blood feels the same way I do
As it pumps through each barren chamber of my heart pounding with each step I take
Slowly making its way through the road maps that are my veins
There’s life here
It’s just locked away somewhere hiding in fear
But I promise you a broken heart doesn’t beat the same as a happy one
I can feel it with every heaving breath that exhales from my blackened lungs
I can feel it

I am lucky
I walk amongst the living still
I say lucky because
I swear most nights I looked death in the face
As she invited me into the comfort of her embrace
I have knelt before the reaper
And let her seductively run her scythe along my throat
I wiped my tears on the foot of her robe
And let her fill my head with fantasies
Where we could run away together
She promised I wouldn’t miss you
She said if I let go
That she would take me to the oasis of souls inhabiting the emptiness that grief holds
But the grief would no longer be mine to hold

Most days now when death comes knocking at my door
I politely ask her to leave
I know my time will come but for now
I do not wish to be the reason that many may grieve
Or the reason their bodies become heavy with sadness that was never theirs to carry
So with the space you left in me
I raised an army of dead
With each day I’d wake and die all over again
And every version of me that buried itself
My body became its own graveyard
I used my necromancer hands to pull each piece of my soul from its grave
I collected my ashes and rose again with the fire of a phoenix
And I told her to wear the heartbreak like armor
Hold the emptiness as a shield
And anything that tries to take you let it fall into the void
Pick up your words, pick up your integrity
It is your weapon
And with each piece of me that has risen again
I slay the thoughts that threaten me
And I remain
With the words engraved in my body
I refuse to die.

Encapsulated

 

Temptation

 

Climbing Up

 

Nude Photography Auckland

Mud

 

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Between two Rocks

 

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The Tree

2019 APPA

Delighted to win four Awards out of four print entries at the 2019 Australian Professional Photography Awards [APPA] by the AIPP. Established in 1963, AIPP promotes the profession of photography, enhancing the skill and knowledge of professional photographers. APPA is largest awards for professional print photography in Australia. A panel of five expert judges are looking for exceptional images that inspire and impress: images that exhibit visual and emotional impact, innovation and creativity. APPA is awarding prints that demonstrate excellence in skill, craftsmanship and conceptual development of an idea.

Woman on a Tree, Sliver with Distinction – 2019 APPA: Portrait In Camera

Woman on a Tree is an exploration of opposing forces: life and death, young and old, power and vulnerability, soft and hard. Its pertinence lies in the symbolism of contradictions. Contradictions are all around us. Humans continue to exploit and overwhelm the natural environment with industrial pollution despite global warming, and its ever present impact on earth. The dead tree, scarred from fires, represents mother nature’s vulnerability to the forces we inflict upon her. I explore the paradox that humanity needs trees to live, yet we keep cutting them down. Despite the beautiful environment being subject to incessant abuse, western society considers itself to be thriving, ignorant to greater issues. The interaction between the human form and the tree is like a love dance. An intimate moment, where the body caresses the tree and with that, offers a gentle apology, a moment of compassion. Humans can empathise with nature’s scars. We have scars too. Some are visible and others are hidden: scars from neglect, abuse, addiction or violence. We have the power to conceal our scars yet the tree is forever exposed. This woman is bare, reflecting the state of the tree. Demonstrating that despite paradoxical contradictions which taint our relationship with earth, we can still find comfort, as she does here. Comfort in one’s skin and comfort in the company of nature. The story that accompanies this piece invites the viewer to reflect on their own identity politics, creating a moment to contemplate our complex relationship with nature. I depict the woman in her most natural state, one with nature. By embracing the human form in all its glory and portraying the woman and tree side by side, it is my vision that the viewer embraces nature as a precious ephemeral organism that needs to be cherished and protected.

Amy, Sliver – 2019 APPA: Portrait In Camera

”I was diagnosed with grade 3 aggressive breast cancer in January 2016. My family has the BRCA1 mutation. Each child of a carrier has a 50% chance of inheriting the gene and each carrier has extremely high risk of cancer. Five of my six great aunts died of cancer by their forties. I had four different chemotherapy drug treatments as well as radiation treatment. Luckily, I had a positive response to treatment and the 5 cm tumour was totally destroyed. I underwent bilateral mastectomy with a two phase silicon reconstruction as well as a total Salpingo-oophorectomy. I also had a hysterectomy surgical operation to remove my uterus. Knowing I have beaten what by nature ought to have been certain death, gives me a sense of immediacy and urgency in life. There is no sense in waiting or hesitating because there is no guarantee of tomorrow!”

Maasai, Sliver – 2019 APPA: Travel

The Maasai inhabit the African Great Lakes region and arrived via the South Sudan. The Maasai are famous for their fearsome reputations as warriors and cattle-rustlers. Maasai society is strongly patriarchal in nature, with elder men, sometimes joined by retired elders, deciding most major matters for each Maasai group. A full body of oral law covers many aspects of behavior. Formal execution is unknown, and normally payment in cattle will settle matters. An out-of-court process is also practiced called ‘amitu’, ‘to make peace’, or ‘arop’, which involves a substantial apology. The monotheistic Maasai worship a single deity called Enkai or Engai. Engai has a dual nature: Engai Narok (Black God) is benevolent, and Engai Na-nyokie (Red God) is vengeful. There are also two pillars or totems of Maasai society: Oodo Mongi, the Red Cow and Orok Kiteng, the Black Cow with a subdivision of five clans or family trees. The maasai also has a totemic animal which is the lion however, the animal can be killed. The way the Maasai kill the lion differs from trophy hunting as it is used in the rite of passage ceremony. The “Mountain of God”, Ol Doinyo Lengai, is located in northernmost Tanzania and can be seen from Lake Natron in southernmost Kenya. The central human figure in the Maasai religious system is the laibon whose roles include shamanistic healing, divination and prophecy, and ensuring success in war or adequate rainfall. Today, they have a political role as well due to the elevation of leaders. Whatever power an individual laibon had was a function of personality rather than position. Many Maasai have also adopted Christianity and Islam. The Maasai are known for their intricate jewelry.
The piercing and stretching of earlobes is common among the Maasai as with other tribes. Various materials have been used to both pierce and stretch the lobes, including thorns for piercing, twigs, bundles of twigs, stones, the cross section of elephant tusks and empty film canisters.
As a historically nomadic and then semi-nomadic people, the Maasai have traditionally relied on local, readily available materials and indigenous technology to construct their housing. The traditional Maasai house was in the first instance designed for people on the move and was thus very impermanent in nature. The houses are either somewhat rectangular shaped with extensions or circular, and are constructed by able-bodied women.
The structural framework of a typical hut is formed of timber poles fixed directly into the ground and interwoven with a lattice of smaller branches wattle, which is then plastered with a mix of mud, sticks, grass, cow dung, human urine, and ash. The cow dung ensures that the roof is waterproof. The enkaj or engaji is small, measuring about 3 × 5 m and standing only 1.5 m high. Within this space, the family cooks, eats, sleeps, socializes, and stores food, fuel, and other household possessions. Small livestock are also often accommodated within the enkaji. Villages are enclosed in a circular fence (an enkang) built by the men, usually of thorned acacia, a native tree. At night, all cows, goats, and sheep are placed in an enclosure in the centre, safe from wild animals.
Shúkà is the Maa word for sheets traditionally worn wrapped around the body. These are typically red, though with some other colors such as blue and plaid patterns. Pink, even with flowers, is not shunned by warriors. One piece garments known as kanga, a Swahili term, are common. Maasai near the coast may wear kikoi, a type of sarong that comes in many different colors and textiles. However, the preferred style is stripes.
Many Maasai in Tanzania wear simple sandals, which were until recently made from cowhides. They are now soled with tire strips or plastic. Both men and women wear wooden bracelets. The Maasai women regularly weave and bead jewellery. This beadwork plays an essential part in the ornamentation of their body. Although there are variations in the meaning of the color of the beads, some general meanings for a few colors are: white, peace; blue, water; red, warrior/blood/bravery.
Beadworking, done by women, has a long history among the Maasai, who articulate their identity and position in society through body ornaments and body painting. Before contact with Europeans, the beads were produced mostly from local raw materials. White beads were made from clay, shells, ivory, or bone. Black and blue beads were made from iron, charcoal, seeds, clay, or horn. Red beads came from seeds, woods, gourds, bone, ivory, copper, or brass. When late in the nineteenth century, great quantities of brightly colored European glass beads arrived in Southeast Africa, beadworkers replaced the older beads with the new materials and began to use more elaborate color schemes. Currently, dense, opaque glass beads with no surface decoration and a naturally smooth finish are preferred.

Drought, Sliver – 2019 APPA: Portrait In Camera

This image represents drought. Climate change has brought drastic changes to many regions on earth. Global warming is causing severe drought. Huge areas that were once fertile are no longer suitable for agriculture. Millions of people are already impacted by these catastrophic changes. A deadly civil war in Syria has erupted when the government decreased the allocation of irrigation water to farmers. Vast regions in Iran are no longer cultivated and the population is helpless. They cannot grow any fruits or vegetables. The earth is dry and so is the woman’s skin, both are cracked. The woman is bare, she is completely exposed – just like our land. This is a desperate call to stop the devastating impact of industrial pollution on our planet.

 

Graham Hooper

Paul Gilbert